UMBRIA - Assisi, Perugia, Gubbio, Todi Orvieto, Cascia, Roccaporena

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In the footsteps of Saint Francis of Assisi and Saint Rita of Cascia

PARTENZE
data 31.12.2017
On request €
PROGRAMMA VIAGGIO
Day 1
+

A trip to Assisi in the morning and then the outskirts of the town in the afternoon: Basilica di Santa Maria degli Angeli with the Porziuncola (Basilica of St. Mary of the Angels with the Portiuncula Chapel), Convento di San Damiano (Convent of St. Damiano), Eremo delle Carceri.

 

Saint Francis of Assisi (Italian: San Francesco d'Assisi), born Giovanni di Pietro di Bernardone, informally named as Francesco (1181/1182 – 3 October 1226), was an Italian Roman Catholic friar, deacon and preacher.

He founded the men's Order of Friars Minor, the women’s Order of Saint Clare, the Third Order of Saint Francis and the Custody of the Holy Land. Francis is one of the most venerated religious figures in history.

Pope Gregory IX canonized Francis on 16 July 1228. Along with Saint Catherine of Siena, he was designated Patron saint of Italy. He later became associated with patronage of animals and the natural environment, and it became customary for Catholic and Anglican churches to hold ceremonies blessing animals on his feast day of 4 October.

In 1219, he went to Egypt in an attempt to convert the Sultan to put an end to the conflict of the Crusades. By this point, the Franciscan Order had grown to such an extent that its primitive organizational structure was no longer sufficient. He returned to Italy to organize the Order. Once his community was authorized by the Pope, he withdrew increasingly from external affairs. Francis is also known for his love of the Eucharist. In 1223, Francis arranged for the first Christmas live nativity scene. 

According to Christian tradition, in 1224 he received the stigmata during the apparition of Seraphic angels in a religious ecstasy  making him the first recorded person in Christian history to bear the wounds of Christ's Passion. He died during the evening hours of 3 October 1226, while listening to a reading he had requested of Psalm 142 (141).

Day 2
+

Perugia, the site of a prestigious university, is a very important city due to Estruscan and Medieval monuments and archeological remains: Porta Marzia (Marzia Gate), Arco di Augusto (Arch of Augustus), Palazzo dei Priori, Fontana Maggiore (the famous fountain) and the Cathedral.


In the afternoon you will be astounded by the visit of Gubbio, a medieval jewel which emerges at the foot of Mount Ingino and still maintains its medieval appearance: Piazza della Signoria, Palazzo dei Consoli, Cathedral, Palazzo Ducale. 

Day 3
+

Todi, a characteristic town, was developed on a hill which dominates the Tevere valley. It was an important centre of the Etruscan, Roman and Medieval ages, which is still demonstrated in certain evocative monuments (Piazza del Popolo, Cathedral, Church of St. Fortunato, Tempio della Consolazione).


In the afternoon stop in Orvieto, a picturesque town, which was initially Etruscan and then Medieval: its Cathedral is one of the most precious examples of Italian Gothic architecture.

Day 4
+

Cascia, the city of St. Rita, with the Basilica dedicated to her, each year gathers numerous pilgrims from all over Italy (Basilica and Monastery of St. Rita).

In the afternoon stop in  Roccaporena, an ancient settlement and St. Rita’s native town.

 

Saint Rita of Cascia (Italian: Santa Rita da Cascia) (Born Margherita Lotti 1381 – 22nd May 1457) was an Italian widow and Augustinian nun venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Rita was married at an early age. The marriage lasted for eighteen years, during which she is remembered for her Christian values as a model wife and mother who made efforts to convert her husband from his abusive behavior. Upon the murder of her husband by another feuding family, she sought to dissuade her sons from revenge.

She subsequently joined an Augustinian community of religious sisters, where she was known both for practicing mortification of the flesh and for the efficacy of her prayers. Various miracles are attributed to her intercession, and she is often portrayed with a bleeding wound on her forehead, which is understood to indicate a partial stigmata.

Pope Leo XIII canonized Rita on 24 May 1900. Her feast day is celebrated on May 22. At her canonization ceremony she was bestowed the title of Patroness of Impossible Causes, while in many Catholic countries, Rita came to be known to be as the patroness of abused wives and heartbroken women.

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PROGRAMMA VIAGGIO
Day 1
+

A trip to Assisi in the morning and then the outskirts of the town in the afternoon: Basilica di Santa Maria degli Angeli with the Porziuncola (Basilica of St. Mary of the Angels with the Portiuncula Chapel), Convento di San Damiano (Convent of St. Damiano), Eremo delle Carceri.

 

Saint Francis of Assisi (Italian: San Francesco d'Assisi), born Giovanni di Pietro di Bernardone, informally named as Francesco (1181/1182 – 3 October 1226), was an Italian Roman Catholic friar, deacon and preacher.

He founded the men's Order of Friars Minor, the women’s Order of Saint Clare, the Third Order of Saint Francis and the Custody of the Holy Land. Francis is one of the most venerated religious figures in history.

Pope Gregory IX canonized Francis on 16 July 1228. Along with Saint Catherine of Siena, he was designated Patron saint of Italy. He later became associated with patronage of animals and the natural environment, and it became customary for Catholic and Anglican churches to hold ceremonies blessing animals on his feast day of 4 October.

In 1219, he went to Egypt in an attempt to convert the Sultan to put an end to the conflict of the Crusades. By this point, the Franciscan Order had grown to such an extent that its primitive organizational structure was no longer sufficient. He returned to Italy to organize the Order. Once his community was authorized by the Pope, he withdrew increasingly from external affairs. Francis is also known for his love of the Eucharist. In 1223, Francis arranged for the first Christmas live nativity scene. 

According to Christian tradition, in 1224 he received the stigmata during the apparition of Seraphic angels in a religious ecstasy  making him the first recorded person in Christian history to bear the wounds of Christ's Passion. He died during the evening hours of 3 October 1226, while listening to a reading he had requested of Psalm 142 (141).

Day 2
+

Perugia, the site of a prestigious university, is a very important city due to Estruscan and Medieval monuments and archeological remains: Porta Marzia (Marzia Gate), Arco di Augusto (Arch of Augustus), Palazzo dei Priori, Fontana Maggiore (the famous fountain) and the Cathedral.


In the afternoon you will be astounded by the visit of Gubbio, a medieval jewel which emerges at the foot of Mount Ingino and still maintains its medieval appearance: Piazza della Signoria, Palazzo dei Consoli, Cathedral, Palazzo Ducale. 

Day 3
+

Todi, a characteristic town, was developed on a hill which dominates the Tevere valley. It was an important centre of the Etruscan, Roman and Medieval ages, which is still demonstrated in certain evocative monuments (Piazza del Popolo, Cathedral, Church of St. Fortunato, Tempio della Consolazione).


In the afternoon stop in Orvieto, a picturesque town, which was initially Etruscan and then Medieval: its Cathedral is one of the most precious examples of Italian Gothic architecture.

Day 4
+

Cascia, the city of St. Rita, with the Basilica dedicated to her, each year gathers numerous pilgrims from all over Italy (Basilica and Monastery of St. Rita).

In the afternoon stop in  Roccaporena, an ancient settlement and St. Rita’s native town.

 

Saint Rita of Cascia (Italian: Santa Rita da Cascia) (Born Margherita Lotti 1381 – 22nd May 1457) was an Italian widow and Augustinian nun venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Rita was married at an early age. The marriage lasted for eighteen years, during which she is remembered for her Christian values as a model wife and mother who made efforts to convert her husband from his abusive behavior. Upon the murder of her husband by another feuding family, she sought to dissuade her sons from revenge.

She subsequently joined an Augustinian community of religious sisters, where she was known both for practicing mortification of the flesh and for the efficacy of her prayers. Various miracles are attributed to her intercession, and she is often portrayed with a bleeding wound on her forehead, which is understood to indicate a partial stigmata.

Pope Leo XIII canonized Rita on 24 May 1900. Her feast day is celebrated on May 22. At her canonization ceremony she was bestowed the title of Patroness of Impossible Causes, while in many Catholic countries, Rita came to be known to be as the patroness of abused wives and heartbroken women.

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