CASERTA, POMPEII, NAPLES

i

History, Legend and Religion

PARTENZE
data 31.12.2017
On request €
PROGRAMMA VIAGGIO
Day 1
+

A trip to the Royal Palace of Caserta, symbol of Caserta and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of the most important monuments of the Italian artistic heritage. It was designed in the 18th Century by the architect Luigi Vanvitelli, according to the will of Charles III, Duke of Bourbon. The Reggia di Caserta (that is, the Royal Palace) is a real masterpiece of architecture and decoration: amazing stucco works, bas-riliefs, paintings in fresco, sculptures. Then, the English Garden opens itself up to its beholder's eye - not as symmetrical as its Italian complement, requested by Maria Carolina d’Austria and bursting with indigenous and exotic plants, including the wonderful Cedars of Lebanon. 

Day 2
+

A trip to Pompeii, located on a plateau formed by the Vesuvius volcano's lava flow. The oldest available traces date this site back to the 7th-6th Centuries B.C. when the first tuff walls, called pappamonte, were built to enclose an area of 63.5 hectares. A mixed population of Etruscans, Greeks and other Italic peoples led to the city's development.

At the end of the 5th Century BC, the Samnites descended from the mountains of Irpinia and Sannio, settled in the plain of the Campania Region (Campania means "fertile plain") and conquered the cities near to Vesuvius and the coast. They created an alliance, the Capital of which was Nucèria. Pompeii entered as a partner (ally) into the political organization of the Roman res publica. However, in 90-89 B.C., the city rebelled, calling for social and political dignity equal to Rome. Pompeii was besieged by the troops of Publius Cornelius Sulla, and in 80 B.C. the city capitulated and became the Roman colony of Cornelia Veneria Pompeianorum. In 62 A.D. a violent earthquake struck the Vesuvius area. In Pompeii, the reconstruction began immediately, but it took an unusually-long time due the extent of the damage. Seventeen years later, on August 24, 79 A.D., the sudden eruption of Vesuvius buried Pompeii with ashes and lapillus.

The buried city was rediscovered in the 16th Century, but it was only in 1748 that the exploration phase began, under the King of Naples Charles III of Bourbon. It continued systematically throughout the 19th Century up to the most recent excavations, restorations and enhancements of the ancient city, with the rediscovering of its exceptional architecture, sculptures, paintings and mosaics.

During the French occupation, in early 1800, the discovery of the House of the Faun, containing the large mosaic depicting Alexander the Great in Battle, caught the imagination of people all over Europe.
Following the Unification of Italy in 1861, the designation of Giuseppe Fiorelli as director marked a turning-point in the excavations process. Fiorelli also pioneered the practice of using plaster casts to reveal the silhouettes of some of the eruption's victims.

In the afternoon visit at the Pontifical Shrine of the Blessed Virgin of the Rosary of Pompei , a Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in Pompeii. The painting of "Our Lady of the Rosary" with its bronze gilt frame is presented to the pilgrims on the high altar. The venerated painting depicts the Virgin Mary and Child Jesus presenting rosaries to Saint Dominic and Saint Catherine of Siena. Originally bought by Dominican priest Alberto Radente for eight carlini in Naples, it was offered to Bartolo Longo on the 13th November 1875 for the church he was building in Pompei.

Day 3
+

A trip to Naples: follow Via Duomo all the way to the Cathedral of Naples dedicated to Our Lady of Assumption. The church was originally built in the Gothic style, but was reconstructed and renovated in other architectural styles over the centuries. The church keeps the blood of Naples Patron Saint, San Gennaro. It’s kept in a little flask that’s supposed to liquefy twice a year in front the crowd. The spectacle is called the Miracle of Saint Gennaro.

The story of the blood miracle

Saint Gennaro was the bishop of Benevento and was beheaded during the persecution of Christians by Diocletian in 305. According to the legend, a woman collected and kept some of the martyr’s blood in an ampoule, after he died. In 313 the miracle occurred for the first time, after the Saint’s skeleton and the ampoule with blood were brought to Naples…

 

Let’s chech out the Gesù Nuovo Church unique façade:

Chiesa del Gesù Nuovo was first built as a Palazzo Sanseverino in the 15th century and was later converted in the 16th-century church. Giuseppe Valeriani designed its unique facade, covered in pyramid shapes that make a great visual experience. It’s a great place to snap a few photos, too.

Then, Piazza del Plebiscito, which is the largest square in Naples and one of the largest open squares in Europe. It is a central gathering place for both residents and tourists of the city. The somewhat odd name of this square is named for the plebiscite (a national referendum of sorts) that was taken in 1860 that unified the Kingdom of Italy under the House of Savoy. Before this had taken place, the city of Naples existed as a separate entity outside the Kingdom of Italy. The building of the Castel Nuovo, also called Maschio Angioino, began in 1279 under the reign of Charles I of Anjou, on the basis of a plan by the French architect Pierre de Chaule. The strategic position of the new castle gave it the characteristics not only of a royal residence, but also those of a fortress. 

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PROGRAMMA VIAGGIO
Day 1
+

A trip to the Royal Palace of Caserta, symbol of Caserta and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of the most important monuments of the Italian artistic heritage. It was designed in the 18th Century by the architect Luigi Vanvitelli, according to the will of Charles III, Duke of Bourbon. The Reggia di Caserta (that is, the Royal Palace) is a real masterpiece of architecture and decoration: amazing stucco works, bas-riliefs, paintings in fresco, sculptures. Then, the English Garden opens itself up to its beholder's eye - not as symmetrical as its Italian complement, requested by Maria Carolina d’Austria and bursting with indigenous and exotic plants, including the wonderful Cedars of Lebanon. 

Day 2
+

A trip to Pompeii, located on a plateau formed by the Vesuvius volcano's lava flow. The oldest available traces date this site back to the 7th-6th Centuries B.C. when the first tuff walls, called pappamonte, were built to enclose an area of 63.5 hectares. A mixed population of Etruscans, Greeks and other Italic peoples led to the city's development.

At the end of the 5th Century BC, the Samnites descended from the mountains of Irpinia and Sannio, settled in the plain of the Campania Region (Campania means "fertile plain") and conquered the cities near to Vesuvius and the coast. They created an alliance, the Capital of which was Nucèria. Pompeii entered as a partner (ally) into the political organization of the Roman res publica. However, in 90-89 B.C., the city rebelled, calling for social and political dignity equal to Rome. Pompeii was besieged by the troops of Publius Cornelius Sulla, and in 80 B.C. the city capitulated and became the Roman colony of Cornelia Veneria Pompeianorum. In 62 A.D. a violent earthquake struck the Vesuvius area. In Pompeii, the reconstruction began immediately, but it took an unusually-long time due the extent of the damage. Seventeen years later, on August 24, 79 A.D., the sudden eruption of Vesuvius buried Pompeii with ashes and lapillus.

The buried city was rediscovered in the 16th Century, but it was only in 1748 that the exploration phase began, under the King of Naples Charles III of Bourbon. It continued systematically throughout the 19th Century up to the most recent excavations, restorations and enhancements of the ancient city, with the rediscovering of its exceptional architecture, sculptures, paintings and mosaics.

During the French occupation, in early 1800, the discovery of the House of the Faun, containing the large mosaic depicting Alexander the Great in Battle, caught the imagination of people all over Europe.
Following the Unification of Italy in 1861, the designation of Giuseppe Fiorelli as director marked a turning-point in the excavations process. Fiorelli also pioneered the practice of using plaster casts to reveal the silhouettes of some of the eruption's victims.

In the afternoon visit at the Pontifical Shrine of the Blessed Virgin of the Rosary of Pompei , a Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in Pompeii. The painting of "Our Lady of the Rosary" with its bronze gilt frame is presented to the pilgrims on the high altar. The venerated painting depicts the Virgin Mary and Child Jesus presenting rosaries to Saint Dominic and Saint Catherine of Siena. Originally bought by Dominican priest Alberto Radente for eight carlini in Naples, it was offered to Bartolo Longo on the 13th November 1875 for the church he was building in Pompei.

Day 3
+

A trip to Naples: follow Via Duomo all the way to the Cathedral of Naples dedicated to Our Lady of Assumption. The church was originally built in the Gothic style, but was reconstructed and renovated in other architectural styles over the centuries. The church keeps the blood of Naples Patron Saint, San Gennaro. It’s kept in a little flask that’s supposed to liquefy twice a year in front the crowd. The spectacle is called the Miracle of Saint Gennaro.

The story of the blood miracle

Saint Gennaro was the bishop of Benevento and was beheaded during the persecution of Christians by Diocletian in 305. According to the legend, a woman collected and kept some of the martyr’s blood in an ampoule, after he died. In 313 the miracle occurred for the first time, after the Saint’s skeleton and the ampoule with blood were brought to Naples…

 

Let’s chech out the Gesù Nuovo Church unique façade:

Chiesa del Gesù Nuovo was first built as a Palazzo Sanseverino in the 15th century and was later converted in the 16th-century church. Giuseppe Valeriani designed its unique facade, covered in pyramid shapes that make a great visual experience. It’s a great place to snap a few photos, too.

Then, Piazza del Plebiscito, which is the largest square in Naples and one of the largest open squares in Europe. It is a central gathering place for both residents and tourists of the city. The somewhat odd name of this square is named for the plebiscite (a national referendum of sorts) that was taken in 1860 that unified the Kingdom of Italy under the House of Savoy. Before this had taken place, the city of Naples existed as a separate entity outside the Kingdom of Italy. The building of the Castel Nuovo, also called Maschio Angioino, began in 1279 under the reign of Charles I of Anjou, on the basis of a plan by the French architect Pierre de Chaule. The strategic position of the new castle gave it the characteristics not only of a royal residence, but also those of a fortress. 

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